Tag Archives: Mohammed Shami

Mohammed Shami and Co show India can pack a pace punch

UTTAR PRADESH :

India captain Virat Kohli celebrates with Mohammed Shami the wicket of England batsman Adil Rashid, on the fourth day of the third Test match between India and England in Mohali on Tuesday. PTI Photo by Vijay Verma(PTI11_29_2016_000081B) (PTI)
India captain Virat Kohli celebrates with Mohammed Shami the wicket of England batsman Adil Rashid, on the fourth day of the third Test match between India and England in Mohali on Tuesday. PTI Photo by Vijay Verma(PTI11_29_2016_000081B) (PTI)

The one great feature for India under Virat Kohli’s Test captaincy has been collective victories, even when individuals stand up and deliver that bit extra. This has allowed the team to make constant changes in the playing eleven forced by injuries.

With India playing all but six of the 20 Tests under his captaincy in the sub-continent — 10 at home — the spin attack, led by Ravichandran Ashwin, has dominated.

However, India’s pace bowlers have provided real value with their wicket-taking ability. No longer content with playing the support role to spin on slow pitches, pace bowlers, Mohammed Shami, Umesh Yadav and Ishant Sharma in particular, have showed they have come of age as a strike unit.

It is not that India pacers have not done well at home. Kapil Dev, Javagal Srinath and Zaheer Khan have produced crucial spells.

But the England series has shown the pace department has taken it to a different level.

In Mohali, India could easily have been left chasing a tricky target but for Mohammed Shami’s double strike in one over with the second new ball. Two perfect short deliveries induced awkward shots from Chris Woakes and Adil Rashid.

Shami bowled perhaps the ball of the second Test in Visakhapatnam, pitched up and swinging in to shatter skipper Alastair Cook’s off-stump.

Of the 20 games under Kohli, only two Tests in Australia in the 2014-15 series were played on pitches conducive to seam. The rest have been on slow tracks.

Shami and Umesh have consistently cranked up their pace to 140 kph plus on slow pitches. And Kohli has used them as attacking options, to provide breakthroughs and not just relief to Ashwin and Co.

Shami has been at his metronomic best since returning to the side in the West Indies, after more than a year out following knee surgery. In the Caribbean, his 11 wickets were only next to Ashwin’s series-leading 17.

Sharing the workload

In this series too, Shami’s 10 wickets again are only next to Ashwin’s 15 and level with Ravindra Jadeja. More importantly, he has bowled 103 overs and Umesh Yadav 94.5 overs, sharing the workload with the spinners (Ashwin 173.4 overs, Jadeja 161 and Jayant 50.3).

Umesh has only five wickets against England, but four catches were dropped off his bowling on a flat Rajkot pitch. Still, he accounted for Joe Root and Ben Stokes, England’s best batsmen so far in this series.

In Visakhapatnam, his dismissal of Jonny Bairstow broke a crucial partnership as England lost their last four wickets for 65 runs. That gave India a 200-run lead and a firm grip on the match.

The spinners may be carrying the day with ball and bat, but Indian pace bowlers have become an integral unit.

source: http://www.hindustantimes.com / Hindustan Times / Home> Sports> Cricket / by N Ananthanarayanan, Hindustan Times / November 29th, 2016

Childhood habit pays dividend for Mohammed Shami against New Zealand

UTTAR PRADESH :

India's Mohammed Shami celebrates with teammates after taking the wicket of New Zealand's Mark Craig. (REUTERS)
India’s Mohammed Shami celebrates with teammates after taking the wicket of New Zealand’s Mark Craig. (REUTERS)

When New Zealand drafted Neil Wagner in the XI here, it was hoped he would trouble the India batsmen with reverse swing, as he is known to do on dry pitches.

Wagner did get reverse swing in the second innings but couldn’t make a mark and remained wicket-less. He got two wickets in the first innings, but not off reverse swing. The India batsmen, especially Rohit Sharma and Ravindra Jadeja negotiated Wagner’s reverse swing well and made things tough for the Black Caps.

When it came to the India bowlers, Mohd Shami worked magic with reverse swing, especially when it mattered.

After 20 overs on Monday, India tasted success when Jadeja claimed Luke Ronchi, who tried to hit against the turn from outside off stump and gave R Ashwin an easy catch at point.

India had to wait thereafter. It was Shami who broke through as he cleaned up Mark Craig with reverse swing — the ball sneaking through bat and pad to send the off-stump flying. Bowling from wide of the crease, he kept the batsman in doubt.

Shami’s magic didn’t stop, and his second wicket opened the floodgates for Ashwin, who then ripped through the Kiwi innings with a six-wicket haul. Shami got one to swing back to catch BJ Watling, known for his defence, plumb in front.

“His (Shami’s) magic with reverse swing is natural as he was never allowed to bowl with the new ball during his early days in his village,” coach Barauddin told HT from Amroha, from where the bowler hails.

“He (Shami) used to bowl with the old ball in tournaments and even after a match used to rub it for further practice against young kids. He always wanted to be called a fast bowler. That’s why he used to get the old ball. It was disappointing initially, but he made the most of it,” he added.

Rare happening

The pavilion end of Green Park produced a record for India as the bowlers claimed all the wickets of the New Zealand second innings from this end.

The only run out of the match was when TV umpire AK Chaudhary declared Ross Taylor out off a direct throw from Umesh Yadav, with the batsman running to the pavilion end.

“There were some solid footmarks for the bowlers near the stumps at the media end and that’s the reason why Ashwin and Jadeja could spin the ball while bowling from the pavilion end,” said curator Shiv Kumar.

source: http://www.hindustantimes.com / Hindustan Times / Home> Sports / Sharad Deep, Hindustan Times, Kanpur / September 26th, 2016

Mohammad Shami joint fastest Indian pacer to reach 50 Test wickets

Amroha, UTTAR PRADESH / Kolkata, WEST BENGAL :

Indian cricketer Mohammed Shami delivers a ball the three-day tour match between India and WICB President's XI squad at the Warner Park stadium in Basseterre, Saint Kitts, on July 14, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Indian cricketer Mohammed Shami delivers a ball the three-day tour match between India and WICB President’s XI squad at the Warner Park stadium in Basseterre, Saint Kitts, on July 14, 2016. / AFP / Jewel SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)

Injuries and bad luck is something which had not let MD Shami enjoy the game for quite some time but finally, it looks like that his time has come. After being available for the Delhi Daredevils throughout the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2016 , Mohammad is a part of the Indian Team in the ongoing Test series against the West Indies and is firing with his ball.

Shami literally rattled the Windies top order in the 1st innings of the first Test, which is being played in Antigua. His 50th Test victim was the experienced Marlon Samuels and he achieved this feat in merely 13 games, which makes him the joint fastest Indian pacer alongside Venkatesh Prasad to 50 Test match wickets.

India cricketer Mohammed Shami (C) is congratulated by teammates during day two of the cricket test match between West Indies and India July 22, 2016 at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium in St John's, Antigua. The decision was made that Brathwaite was not out. / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
India cricketer Mohammed Shami (C) is congratulated by teammates during day two of the cricket test match between West Indies and India July 22, 2016 at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium in St John’s, Antigua. The decision was made that Brathwaite was not out. / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)

The right arm fast bowler was phenomenal in the first two sessions on Day 3 and his opening wicket was batsman Rajendra Chandrika. Shami kept attacking by bowling a tight off-stump line with the support of an attacking inner ring field set-up. It was obvious this strategy would reap rewards as he got one to move away from Darren Bravo and Bravo had no clue.

He bowled a magical over, where he took 2 wickets, that of Samuels and Blackwood and didn’t give away a single run. His other partners were hardly posing any trouble but Shami played it smart by making the batsman play almost every delivery of his.

We all know that Shami is immensely backed by both Test and ODI captains and the selectors as well but had a real tough time after he injured his knee during the marque 2015 World Cup in Australia. The doctors had said that it might be a career-threatening one but the 26-year-old did not give up and tried coming back in the Australia tour earlier this year but was again haunted by the knee injury. He finally came back in the IPL and now is in full flow against the West Indies as we see our beloved fast bowler in the Indian jersey.
We hope that he stays fit, in the long run, as Team India have a hectic Test season coming up as the team is scheduled to play 16 more Test matches, after this one.

source: http://www.circleofcricket.co / Circle of Cricket / Home> Latest News / by baggabhrigu / July 24th, 2016

Shami Sensational, But Kiwis Hold Edge

Shami_APMPos09feb2014

Sometimes, a simplistic gauging of skills through numbers is insufficient. Take for instance, Mohammed Shami’s in the first innings– 28-6-95-1. Someone who hasn’t seen him bowl would grossly understate him and his craft. That he was profusely unlucky on the first morning dissipates into thin vacuum in the final stock-checking of history through numbers. The number of times he beat the bat and the catches dropped won’t be factored in.

Young bowlers react differently to it. Most would be wide-eyed and desperate. Some turn petulant and fidgety. Some are beset with doubts. A few, though, would simply remain unflustered.  Shami conforms to the latter group. For all the lack of luck in the first innings, Shami remained impervious to it.  If any, he just improvised on his bowling.

He pitched the ball a couple of centimeters further to the batsmen, almost a drivable length but not quite drivable. And he was faster by a few yards and he swung the ball both ways. And this time round, he got a wicket off the last ball of the first over. The delivery that pinged Hamish Rutherford wasn’t any magical but simply perfect. It pitched on middle and snuck back just onto his pads.

His next wicket—again off the last ball of an over—came off smart planning. He mixed his length to Peter Fulton before eventually snapping him up with a routine half-volley. In the first over, he tempted him to drive whereas in the second, he pushed him onto the back-foot with short-of-length balls shaping into his body. Fulton, with a tendency to keep his feet static, drove from the crease and edged to Ravindra Jadeja at short-cover.

He almost consumed Ross Taylor with the first ball of his next over, only for the edge to fall short of the gully. Three balls later, an inside edge saved him from being trapped adjacent. He tested his technique as well temperament, and the latter survived more by default than design. His four overs before lunch set the tone for India’s belated comeback. “No doubt he is a match-winner. His quality to take wickets in bunches is what decides him from a good bowler to a really, really good bowler” Zaheer Khan said later.

After lunch, too, he steamed in and harassed Taylor, who by then had shed his intentions to attack. But for the odd ball that strayed down, Taylor shut-shop completely. And he was lucky that he wasn’t subject to embarrassment like Corey Anderson.  Shami took most of the balls away from him before he made one snake back. Anderson was caught unawares and the balls sneaked through the gate.

And for the first time in the series, India’s bowlers demonstrated pack mentality. Shami was duly supplemented by Zaheer Khan and Ishant Sharma. Even Jadeja, wasteful hitherto, strangled the batsmen.

Scoreboard

New Zealand (1st innings) 503. India (1st innings, overnight 130-4) Rohit b Boult 72, Rahane c Taylor b Southee 26, Dhoni c Watling b Wagner 10, Jadeja (not out) 30, Zaheer c Watling b Wagner 14, Ishant c Boult b Southee 0, Shami c Fulton b Wagner 2, Extras (b-5, lb-6, w-3, nb-3) 17, Total (10 wickets, 60 overs) 202. Fall of wickets: 1-1, 2-3, 3-10, 4-51, 5-138, 6-138, 7-167, 8-188, 9-189. Bowling: Boult 17-2-38-3, Southee 19-6-38-3, Anderson 5-0-29-0, Wagner 11-0-64-4, Sodhi 6-0-13-0, Williamson 2-0-9-0.

New Zealand (2nd innings) Fulton c Jadeja b Shami 5, Rutherford lbw Shami 0, Williamson c Jadeja b Zaheer 3, Taylor c Rahane b Zaheeer 41, B McCullum (run out) 1, Anderson b Shami 2, Watling b Ishant 11, Southee c Pujara b Jadeja 14, Sodhi c Rohit b Ishant 0, Wagner c Jadeja b Ishant 14, Boult (not out) 7, Extras (b-4, w-1, nb-2) 7, Total (all out; 41.2 overs) 105. Fall of wickets: 1-1, 2-9, 3-11, 4-15, 5-25, 6-63, 7-78, 8-78, 9-80. Bowling: Shami 12-1-37-3, Zaheer 9-2-23-2, Ishant 10.2-3-28-3, Jadeja 9-4-10-1, Rohit 1-0-3-0.

India (2nd Innings)  Vijay c Watling b Southee 13, Dhawan (batting) 49, Pujara (batting) 22, Extras (w-1, nb-2) 3,  Total (one wicket; 25 overs) 87. Fall of wicket: 1-36. Bowling: Boult 6-0-28-0, Southee 5-0-18-1, Wagner 6-2-11-0, Anderson 3-0-8-0, Sodhi 4-1-17-0, Williamson 1-0-5-0.

source: http://www.newindianexpress.com / The New Indian Express / Home> Cricket> News / by Sandeep G. / ENS – Chennai / February 09th, 2014